• Try Something Different: Music To Make Yoga To

    Posted on October 11, 2009 by in All Posts, Yoga Tips

    I love practicing yoga to music.  Mantra and kirtan (chanting with musical accompaniment) are wonderful and can add so much to the transcendental aspect of a meditative yoga class.  However, much like individual people, there is so much music out there, all so varied and beautiful.

    “Music is what feelings sound like.”

    In conjunction with the physical movement of a yoga class, music can provide an incredible emotional release.  We tend to store a lot of emotions within our physical body (example: notice what happens to your neck and shoulders when you’re feeling stressed).  The power of practicing yoga postures is the way in which it strengthens our body-mind connection.  The power that music has is its ability to get you out of an analytical, thinking state and into a more intuitive, feeling state. The two combined can be quite effective for releasing emotional “stuck” places.  Music also has the ability to inspire a frame of mind open to creativity and joy.  Think about a song that, every time you hear it, you feel different, you feel like moving and dancing, simply for the fun of it!

    “Music produces a kind of pleasure which human nature cannot do without” -Confucius

    Mix it up. A universal language, there is truly music for everyone and for every experience.  I recommend trying something a little different next time you practice.  Try making a playlist of your favorite songs, no matter the genre or if it might seem totally wrong at first.  Try music that moves you – to tears, to laughter, joy, excitement, rage, anything.  Experiment with this.  Play around and above all, have FUN with it.  By the way, it is also perfectly acceptable to sing and dance in a yoga class.  In fact, I recommend it.

    “Music and rhythm find their way into the secret places of the soul”-Plato

    Upbeat and Uplifting. Here are some examples of music that is GREAT for a yoga class, music that I enjoy playing on occasion:

    • The Beatles pretty much any song
    • Coldplay Viva la Vida, God Put A Smile Upon Your Face
    • Jason Mraz I’m Yours
    • Jem It’s Amazing, Keep On Walking
    • Gnarls Barkley Going On, Smiley Faces
    • Justin Timberlake My Love feat. T.I. and Timbaland
    • MIA Pull Up the People, Sunshowers, Paper Planes
    • Bitter:Sweet Don’t Forget To Breathe
    • Goldfrapp Beautiful
    • Feist I Feel It All
    • OK Go Invincible, Do What You Want
    • Vampire Weekend M79, Bryn, The Kids Don’t Stand a Chance

    Yoga and music dork that I am, I could go on and on ….. and on.  Hopefully, you get the idea but if you happen to be thinking, “What the heck is she talking about?”  It’s okay.  Emotional reactions to music are completely subjective.  Like I said, try some of YOUR favorite music and see what happens.

    Namaste and Rock On with Your Funky Self ……

    Lindsay

    Please share an example of your favorite music to “make yoga” to below!

    “Music speaks what cannot be expressed, soothes the mind and gives it rest, heals the heart and makes it whole, flows from heaven to the soul.”

6 Responsesso far.

  1. san diego yoga…

    Whether one believes yoga to be spiritual or recreational, should the government really be making that distinction for us? And, for that matter, with obesity wreaking havoc on the nation’ s health care system, should the state be discouraging those who…

  2. Marta says:

    I usually do not do commenting. but thanks for this great post and looking forward to more.

  3. Guru Talks says:

    nice post Lindsay :)

  4. Christine says:

    This was a big controversy at a studio where I taught several years ago. I continue to believe that music is just an intentional way to interact with your yoga experience. You’re going to have sounds in your environment regardless of whether you choose the dominant groove or simply listen to the sounds of life where you are – unless maybe you’re in a sensory deprivation tank, but I don’t think you could even do woga in there! Clearly, I think the intentional method is a great way to go. I have a plethora of grooves – from Chemical Brothers to Raga & Kirtan, Tibetan Chants and Vivaldi – for my own practice, but tend to choose the instrumental for teaching.

  5. Looks like you and I were on the same yoga page musically speaking today! My blog post was all about my yoga theme songs!
    Couldn’t agree more that music enhances your yoga experience.
    You’ve got some great songs in that playlist. Yoga Rocks!

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